Author Interview : Tony Halker @tonyhalker

Hello Readers! Today, I’m happy to welcome Tony Halker, author of Displaced, for an interview. Also check out the book details in this post. I hope you enjoy the post.

Book Details:

Displaced by Tony Halker
Publication Date:
February 10th 2019
Genre: Literary Historical Fiction

Synopsis:

In a landscape of pre-history, a time of ancestor worship, young Druid priests Owayne and Nial, are tasked to travel and learn all they can of rite and rule in a world of competing tribes, unsettling technologies and priest power.

Displaced people wander the lands, forced there by conflict and hunger, where they are used to create chaos. Fertility is revered, children have value for work, in marriage, for worship and sacrifice. 
Superstition, religion and ancestor beliefs have power for good and or evil, inflicting pain or kindness and sometimes both. 
Amongst the chaos pass our two priests, seeking to learn from and influence events. A mysterious helper, Bron is with them. It is unclear whether he aids them or is simply to watch and report their actions. They love, make friends, struggle and fight to alter fate; meeting decent peoples whose belief and actions conflict with their own. They have to reconcile friendships and very different values.

These modern issues and events are played out in a landscape of our pre-history, one that we can see and touch today. 
A tribal lord resists the march of progress, fighting for values that no longer resonate with his family or clan. Battles of mind, values and technologies occur. Those who prevail ultimately determine the telling of history. 

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Tony Halker is an Indie author who has published two novels and collaborated in creating a book about deep space photography. His novels are literary fiction, concerned with modern themes, set in a landscape of our pre-history. He wants the emotion of landscape to form and influence the characters in his novels. Having worked as a geologist and in business management, he travelled extensively before making time to write. His second novel, “Displaced” was published in 2019. His first novel, “The Learn” was published by Clink Street in 2016.

1. What made you decide to become an author?

Writing found me. I realized about five years ago that I was periodically trying to write. I was creating chapters of novels that were formulating in my head. They were poorly thought out, but were going down on a keyboard and even being printed out. I kept them for a while to let them ferment or mature and then threw them away. It was re-reading and throwing some away that made me realize how much I enjoyed writing. I had a hope that I could do better and become a story teller who can engage readers while considering important issues for us all. Writing helps me rationalize my life and that of my family.

2. Can you tell readers little about your book? What they can expect from the book?

I hope “Displaced” is an enjoyable, intelligent, sometimes challenging novel that has us consider important issues for our world through the eyes and minds of characters we can like and identify with. It is set in all of our history, which gives me more freedom to be controversial. Though the book considers difficult issues for our time it has an uplifting and positive theme. I hope the front cover image projects that.

3. How did you come up with the idea for your book?

I needed a canvas to tell a modern story of people like all of us. I enjoy walking where our ancestors walked and lived and were shaped by the kindness or harshness of the landscape in their time. I like writing about that landscape. A beautiful view is a set of emotions that make and influence us. I have tried to place people like us with modern issues of family, tribe, love, religion and abuse of power, in that place and to weave a tale around them.

4. What sort of research did you do to write this book?

I tried to understand the names and make up of ancient deities of natural things, streams, rivers, trees and mountains. I looked at folklore and festivals passed down to us that seem to remember those beliefs. I walked to and visited ancient monuments and artefacts. Those things stimulated in me a view of what the people may have been like; those who found time to create and enjoy beauty many years ago as they fought to survive and prosper for themselves and their families. I did some research as to how ancient artefacts were made.

5. Who are some authors that inspire you?

I read many different types of books and am inspired by so many of them for different reasons. While I like a well told story, I also want a book to make me think and pull at my emotions. I am reading a book called The Garden of Evening Mists by Tan Twan Eng. It is the second time I have read it, it travels well. I also recently read Warlight by Michael Ondaatje. Last year I read a wonderful book called, “A Gentleman in Moscow” by Amor Trowles; this had wonderful characterization and optimism in difficult times.

6. What type of characters do you love and hate to write? Your favorite quality in protagonist.

I want a protagonist to be thoughtful, intelligent and self-aware. I am a little afraid of making my narrative voice that of a woman. I have read some books recently where someone has tried to put themselves in a head very different from their own and it does not always work. My favorite qualities are intelligence and empathy. I hate bluster and macho action without thought.

7. What was your favorite chapter (or part) of writing this book and why?

There is a chapter that is really about the landscape and its part in the novel. It is called, “Battles Between Land and Sea”. I am an ex geologist and I think of this chapter as my indulgence. I was able to write it quickly. The land and sea are imbued with personality and power and wish to defeat each other. My novel is not a fantasy in any way, though some may say that by giving, sea, rocks and land life I have let more than nature in.

8. What was the hardest part of writing the book? Was there anything that you deleted or altered?

The hardest things is working on voice to make a character consistent and someone whom a reader can engage with and want to hear more about and from. I continually change many things. Everything!

9. What are your most favorite and least favorite thing about being an author?

My favorite thing is being free to write and allowing my mind to create worlds and characters that are from my imagination. I can give myself a licence to make the world as I want it to be, though I rarely do so. My least favorite thing is that when I am on a roll and writing I often let my coffee go cold. It does not taste as good after I microwave it warm!

10. Do you have any writing rituals?

Coffee. I also often walk in the countryside before starting to write, especially if I am finding it hard to move a novel on. I often know something does not work, but not why or what the solution may be. Walking and talking can get me moving on. I also try to read every day when I am writing.

11. What is the next project you’re working on?

I have two novels on the go that are completely different from my previous novels. I am trying to write about the present time, that means my imagination has less licence. I tried this once before and went back to the freedom of the setting of “Displaced”.

12. And the last one, Top 3 tips for aspiring authors.
  • A novel is a marathon. Keep going and drink coffee.
  • Trust yourself; believe in yourself.
  • Edit, edit and edit and then ask someone else to edit.

How can readers discover more about you and you work?

Website: http://www.tonyhalker.com
Blog: http://www.tonyhalker.com/blog
Facebook: @tonyhalkerauthor @learnorfade
Twitter: @tonyhalker
Goodreads: Tony Halker
Instagram: tonyhalker2
Book Links: (Amazon): https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1794683453

Thank you Tony Halker for this interview, again!

What do you think about the post?
Have you read this book already or any book by Tony Halker?

Share your thoughts in the comment-box below.

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Hi, I'm Yesha, an Indian book blogger. Avid and eclectic reader who loves to read with a cup of tea. Not born reader but I don't think I’m going to stop reading books in this life. “You can never get a cup of tea large enough or a book long enough to suit me.”

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