#Guestpost : Writer’s Block by Fredrick Robertson #CrookedCreek #Humor #Fiction @RPoli3

Hello Readers! Today I’m happy to welcome Frederick Robertson, author of Crooked Creek– a humorous novella about writer’s block and a neurotic homeowners association- on Books Teacup and Reviews to talk about Writer’s Block. It’s the classic overbearing “king or queen and the feeble subject” situation. Please check out the guest post and more about book in this post.

Writer’s Block

Sardonic humor and writer’s block fit together perfectly. Writer’s block itself is so humorous. You can’t write when you have it, but writing is the only way to get out of it. So why is it so hard to write your way through it? Exactly. You got issues. Are they deep-seeded issues swimming in your unconscious surfacing at night in your dreams? Easy there, we are just trying to put keys to the page over here, but since you brought up Dr. Jung and the unconscious, we might as well figure you out.

Hell, if we could get through this block, your best seller would easily pay for that fancy Jungian Analyst with the deep and dark office over on Park Avenue to improve your relationship with the writer within you. Oh, that explains your problems, you’re in a relationship.

Dr. Jung, huh… We’ll just shovel through the fancy stuff as I am sure your Instagram account is dinging. Two types of writers: the ones that plot and plan and “flesh out” everything, and then the other writers. You know the second type of writer. They have some weird place deep within their unconscious where the muses dance and the fountains flow. They dream of bears galloping down trout streams at full speed as the crisp air blows through their snout.

Is one type of writer better than the other? Hell no. You did say you had emotional issues, so we’ll just keep moving forward. They are both fantastic. Do I need to tell you why? Are you keeping up here? They are both writers. No matter how blocked you are or how much drivel spews out of you, no one can take that from you. You are the closest thing to a Muse in this world, and that my writer friend is the key to the relationship. The muses can’t express themselves without you, and you can’t express yourself without them. Do I need to set up a trust with a divorce attorney to protect myself from my muses taking it all? That third ex-wife did some damage.

Look, the muses already own it all. It’s all theirs. You can’t have it. Sorry. It is too much for you, anyway. It is some deep, powerful stuff. Stuff is the scientific term. But wait. The muses can’t express or say anything without you. You are somebody. You are powerful. You are the artist. Easy killer, we still need to get through this block. Fran Lebowitz is still more than twenty years into her self proclaimed “blockade.”

How do I work through this block? Well, if you are the plotter and planner, you got to listen to those feelings inside of yourself. No, I’m not doing that; I plan and plot so well, you say. I can control them. I’m the boss. Hey, you lady muses over there lounging by the fountain – pick up those shovels, we got a garden to plant. Good luck with that. Listen to that part of you that guides you without you knowing it. Your plotting and planning so much the muses don’t get to say anything. Give a little feeling to the plotting and planning. You know the ones you had dancing with your third cousin at prom. Romantic but not. Freeing but not. Oh, yeah, baby. You’re feeling it now, you sexy plotter and planner.

What if I am the other type of writer? Nothing is flowing out of my fountain. It’s dried out for a reason. You heard me. Pull yourself together. They can’t work with you like that all the time. I think that type of behavior is illegal in several states. I’m not asking you to outline a whole book or, hell, even a chapter. But let’s give the Muse Ladies just an idea of yours for a chapter. I’m not playing mediation here, but they want at least a little from you. They can’t just let it come out all the time—Mr. Smooth-flowing summer breeze. Give them a little something to work with here. Christ, do I need to call a guardian, mother, or parole officer?

You’re a big-time writer, and it is important to me that you succeed in the art whether you plot and plan or just let it flow. Our world needs to hear the Muses, and we need to feel them dancing around the garden and playing in the fountain. It’s beautiful.

Book Details:

Crooked Creek by Frederick Robertson
Publication Date: September 16, 2020
Genre: Humor, Fiction
Format: eBook
Page Count: 73
Price: $0.99

Synopsis:

Billy’s first novel launched him into literary stardom. Now all he has to do is write a second book.

His decision to move back to his hometown might not have been in his best interest. The neurotic homeowners association has different plans to manipulate and distract him.

What’s worse? He can’t seem to write down a single word.

Billy soon learns you can find inspiration in the most unexpected places – even if everything else is against you.

Praise for Crooked Creek:


“This is a fun story that is a quick read… overflowing with humor and maybe a mix of reality… If you enjoy comedy, this is a great one for you.” – 5 stars on Amazon

“Crooked Creek is a very hilarious book with unprecedented happenings that sucks you right into the storyline. The struggling writer buys a home in a relative inexpensive housing society only to be thrown into one comic situation after another.” – 5 stars on Amazon

“…Nicely written and will most certainly entertain the reader with sheer enjoyment. The book is cleverly written, a nice sprinkling of pithy interaction, doses of sarcasm, and just a good humorous narrative.” – 5 stars on Amazon

Purchase Link:

About Author:

Fredrick Robertson enjoys creative writing and studying Dr. Carl Jung, dreams, and the unconscious.

Born and raised in Greenville, SC, Fredrick studied English at The Citadel attending one semester abroad in Madrid, Spain. He later went to Pacifica Graduate Institute and studied Depth Psychology, focusing on Jungian Analytical Psychology and dreamwork.

Fredrick is married with two children. He enjoys writing on his Royal Model O 1937 typewriter.

You can connect with Fredrick on his website or his two Japanese-based factories.

www.fredrickrobertson.com
www.superiorbands.com
https://thepaperstrawfactory.com/


I hope you enjoyed reading this post. Let me know in comments what do you think about this guest post, if you have read this book or going to add to TBR.

Happy Reading!

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Hi, I'm Yesha, an Indian book blogger. Avid and eclectic reader who loves to read with a cup of tea. Not born reader but I don't think I’m going to stop reading books in this life. “You can never get a cup of tea large enough or a book long enough to suit me.”

11 thoughts on “#Guestpost : Writer’s Block by Fredrick Robertson #CrookedCreek #Humor #Fiction @RPoli3

  1. An interesting post, Yesha! I always wondered if plotters and planners ever have the writing block- I guess everybody does….Love what you said in the comment above about the reviewer’s block. I found a few times that although I really, really liked the book, I just couldn’t express my feelings. How long does it usually take you to write your amazing reviews?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you! I’m glad you enjoyed the post. Time it takes to write review is depends on mood and how much I enjoy the book. If it’s tough to write review, I might take a day or two if I really love the book I can write review in an hour or two. I find it easy to write review in morning after breakfast. On rest of the day my mind keep drifting to other things. I thinks it’s different with everyone. Observing my own mood and patterns is what helped me in figuring out what works best.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Thank you so much for letting me guest blog. I love your work. You post the most beautiful pictures on your Instagram. I appreciate it. Your daughter is so cute. I love the picture of her coloring the Giraffe with its symbolism of the imagination. I wish I could keep my head in the clouds all the time like a Giraffe!!!! Until then I am going to follow your lead and drink a cup of tea and read a fun book!!

    Liked by 1 person

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