#BookReview : Paris on Repeat (Wish & Wander #1) by Amy Bearce #ParisOnRepeat #MiddleGrade @JollyFishPress

Paris on Repeat (Wish & Wander #1) by Amy Bearce
Publication Date : July 14th 2020
Publisher : Jolly Fish Press
Genre : Middle Grade / Magical realism

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

GROUNDHOG DAY gets a hilarious French twist in this delightful upper middle grade novel about first crushes and friendship when an eighth-grade class trip to Paris goes horribly wrong and the worst day of one girl’s life keeps happening over and over.

Fourteen-year-old Eve Hollis is ready to push through her fears and finally let her crush know how she feels. And what better place to tell him than on top of the Eiffel Tower in the City of Love? But things don’t go as planned, and Eve is sure she’s had the worst day of her life— until she wakes up the next morning to realize the whole disaster of a day is happening again. She’s trapped in a time loop.

Desperate to make it stop, Eve will have to take some big risks and learn from her mistakes or she’s destined to live the most awkwardly painful day of her life over and over again, forever.

*** Note: I received e-copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review. Many thanks to publisher. ***

Paris on Repeat was interesting spin on Groundhog Day that revolved around Eve and her attempts to break the time loop in Paris. It was about friendship, anxiety, finding courage to talk about your feelings, understanding relationships and real meaning of love.

I haven’t watched Groundhog Day movie but now I want to. Writing was easy to follow, gripping and emotive. It was told in first person narrative from Eve’s POV. I loved the setting of Paris, it was heart of the book and author described places, food and little facts here and wonderfully.

I loved the concept and theme. It started with Eve standing in front of Eiffel tower on the last day of the school trip giving herself pep talk, putting bad start of the day with a bump on head aside, preparing herself to finally come out with her feeling for Jace which give her hope that love lasts forever. But things started to go from bad to worst that brought out buried emotions, and she did something horrible at the end of the day. But next day instead of teacher announcing to pack bags it started the same as yesterday. At first, she couldn’t believe it but then she felt lucky for getting another chance and again it went from bad to horrible, soon she realised she was stuck in time loop and had to relive the horrible last day until she did something to break it.

I was curious to find out what she will do to break the loop and how she was stuck in it in first place, if it was about her being brave, revealing her feeling to Jace or being better friend letting her friend be happy with Jace, or something else.

At first I thought I wouldn’t like this as much as I was expecting with weird first line for middle grade but as I read more I enjoyed it. All loop repetition was written cleverly. Though places and events were the same, author changed things as the character developed with element of surprise. Text never felt repetitive in each time loop.

Eve was 14 years old introvert and nerd. She had a set of rule being military kid so it wouldn’t be hard for her when she had to move to another country or place and start again. She tried her best to be invisible and keeping her true feeling hidden. But when she was stuck in time loop she had to break her rules to break the it and in doing so she discovered many things about herself, her friends, friendship and love.

Eve’s development was the best part of the book. Her feelings were raw and honest. I felt for her. What she was feeling with her parent’s divorce and unrequited love and what she did was genuine and realistic. I liked how with each time loop she realised what she did wrong both with her parents and friends.

Reggie was amazing character. When she knew what was happening after third loop, I loved how she helped Eve and even admitted she should have asked about her feelings and listened to Eve rather than talking herself all the time. I enjoyed reading their conversations and the way they made things right between each other.

I liked the message about love, friendship, and relationship, about- what real love is, it’s never just about relationship between girl and boy, there’s all kind of love and even friendship has a love; divorce is sad thing and hard to accept but one cannot force love and even after trying lot of things to save relationships, love definitely doesn’t last forever for everyone; not everything happens in life the way you wish, it might end terribly but every ending is new beginning if you have courage.

Sixth loop, the last one, was amazing. Eve tried all different things, lived free, broke all her rules, revealed all hidden feelings to her friends and told about her parents’ divorce. With help of Reggie, Sophia, Jace and mysterious palm reader she broke the loop at the end.

Why 4.5 stars-

“I never realised how much the Eiffel Tower looked like a giant middle finger. Standing before it now, I wanted to return the salute.” This first line was not really impressive for middle grade book. Apart from this line there was nothing wrong in the book and nothing like this have said in the book.

Overall,

Paris on Repeat was interesting, fast paced, both fun and sad magical realism fiction about friendship and courage. I recommend this to upper middle grade/teen readers.

Book Links : Goodreads | Amazon.com | Amazon.in

Affiliate Link : Book Depository


I hope you enjoyed this post. Let me know in comments what you think about this book and my review, if you have read this already. Which is your favourite magical realism book?

Happy Reading!

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#GuestPost: Where Do Good Story Ideas Come From? by Tara Gilboy #Rewritten #MiddleGrade #Fantasy @JollyFishPress

Hello Readers! Today I’m pleased to share guest post from Tara Gilboy, as a part of blog tour for Rewritten. Rewritten is Middle Grade Fantasy, second book in Unwritten series. If you missed my review on this book, check it out➡ HERE ⬅.

Guest Post: Where Do Good Story Ideas Come From?

One of the most common questions writers get asked is “where do you get your ideas from?” Often when I hear this question I freeze, because I’m not sure I have a good answer to it. I get ideas for stories all the time; I believe one of the requirements of being an author is to remain forever curious about the world.  Or perhaps writers are all a bit prone to anxiety. One of my professors in graduate school remarked that she thought ideas often come from a writer’s neuroticism. We are always imagining the worst that could happen in any given situation, and then rather than letting our worries develop into severe phobias, we write stories about them.

Recently, I was hiking on a mountain trail near my house, and as the sun started to set, I began imagining all the things that might jump out of the trees just beyond the next ridge. Axe murderers? A bigfoot creature? (Local legends call this creature a ‘zoobie.’) Ghosts? My mind started wandering about what would happen if something did leap out from behind a rock, and suddenly I was making up a story in my head about campers who stumble on a cell phone while hiking a trail, and on the phone is video footage of what happened to its owner…

So ideas are all around us all the time. Getting good ideas for stories is another thing entirely.  Most of the ideas I come up with are terrible, as my writing friends can attest. (Well, who wouldn’t want to read a story about a mountain-dwelling zoobie?)

The idea for Rewritten evolved from a variety of factors. When I finished Unwritten (for those of you unfamiliar with it, it’s a middle grade fantasy about a girl named Gracie who is a character from an unpublished fairy tale, whose parents took her out of the story, and into the real world, as a baby, to save her life), I knew if I wrote a sequel, Gracie would need to go into another story world, but I wasn’t sure what this story world would be. Would she go back to Bondoff, the fairy tale land of her birth? Somewhere else?

As I was struggling with these ideas and working on some other writing projects, I was also performing improv and taking classes at a San Diego comedy theater. A couple of the classes I took were on longform improv. One of the things we talked about was how to perform an improvised full-length play in a particular genre. It could be science fiction, Shakespeare, horror, film noire, musical…. You get the idea. As an exercise in class, we sat down and listed “tropes” for every genre, things that are common to each. For example, in Shakespeare, there are a lot of misunderstandings, mistaken identity, metaphors, love stories, etc. In film noire, there is usually rampant sexism, chain-smoking detectives, and dialogue that uses words like “dame” and “ace.” These lists got me thinking a lot about what genre might provide the highest stakes for Gracie, and it wasn’t long before I zeroed in on gothic horror, which also happens to be one of my favorite genres to read.

I spent a lot of time reading classics like Dracula and Frankenstein and making lists of tropes and clichés. I knew I needed a setting that was very contained, claustrophobic even. I imagined an old manor house, which I named Blackwood Hall. I wanted a creature that haunted the night. I listed spooky imagery like cemeteries, dark woods, shadowy hallways. Even then, though, the book hadn’t taken shape: I was stuck. I kept starting and stopping: even though I knew where Gracie’s journey would take her, I hadn’t figured out yet what that journey meant for her. In other words, I hadn’t figured out what Gracie’s goal was.

It wasn’t until I started delving deep into Gracie’s character, figuring out what her emotional wounds were that she needed to resolve, and thinking carefully about what she wanted (which ended up being about grappling with the events of Unwritten and who she was) that I was able to complete the novel. It was only then that I understood what impact traveling into the world of Blackwood Hall would have on Gracie.

And that brings me back to my point about what makes a good story idea. In order to have an idea that is sufficient to create a whole story, you have to know what your main character wants. This is the through line that will sustain your novel and hold all the events together, so that it feels like a cohesive story. Every time I’ve started a novel that floundered (I’ve written A LOT of partial novels that I abandoned halfway through), it’s because my protagonist didn’t have a strong enough goal. Ideas are all around us, and if you keep your eyes open and your curiosity sharp, you will find them. Once you’ve found your idea, think carefully about what that idea means for the main character. If you’re writing about time-traveling opera singers from outer space, or a town built of cotton candy, or a family of misunderstood mountain monsters, make sure you know what that journey means for your characters. That’s how you turn a random idea into a story readers won’t be able to put down.

Book Details:

Rewritten (Unwritten #2) by Tara Gilboy
Expected publication Date: April 7th 2020
Publisher: North Star Editions/Jolly Fish Press
Genre: Middle Grade / Fantasy

“After learning the truth about her own fairy tale, twelve-year-old Gracie wants nothing more than to move past the terrible things author Gertrude Winters wrote about her and begin a new chapter in the real world. If only things were going as planned. On the run from the evil Queen Cassandra, the characters from Gracie’s story have all been forced to start over, but some of them cannot forget Gracie’s checkered past.

Even worse, Gracie discovers that as long as Cassandra has her magical book, the Vademecum, Gracie’s story is still being written and none of the characters are safe, including her mom and dad. In a desperate attempt to set things right, Gracie finds herself transported into another one of Gertrude’s stories—but this one is a horror story. Can Gracie face her destiny and the wild beast roaming the night, to rewrite her own story?”

Book LinksGoodreads | Jolly Fish Press

Affiliate Links : Book Depository | Amazon (UK) | Amazon (IN) | Amazon (US)


What do you think about the book and post? Have you read this book already or any book in this series? Are you going to add it to TBR?

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#GuestPost : Home (After it Happened Book 9) by Devon C. Ford #Home #AfteritHappened @vulpine_press @DevonFordAuthor

Hello Readers! Today I’m pleased to welcome Devon C Ford on Books Teacup and Reviews to talk about the location inspiration for his new post-apocalyptic/sci-fi book, Home in After it Happened series. Check out the book details and interesting guest post below.

Home (After it Happened Book 9) by Devon C. Ford


Publication Date: March 27th 2020


Publisher: Vulpine Press


Genre: post-apocalyptic / sci-fi

Synopsis:

Safety is an illusion. Security is only a fleeting sense. Peace is a myth. 

Steve and the other survivors in the UK have rebuilt and healed after the brutal end to the reign of Richards. But removing a dictator was only the beginning… 

Years after a mistake of compassion and humanity, an enemy thought long gone returns to bring down a rain of violence and terror the likes of which they have never seen before. 

Their society, a peaceful one of trade and co- operation, has moved on from the bloody aftermath of the collapse, but that evolution blunts their teeth to be able to combat the new threat. 

The call to return to the rainy shores of England is strong for Dan and his fearless accomplices, so they return home to do what they do best: bring justice to a lawless world. 

About Series:

Set in the UK in the immediate aftermath of a mysterious illness which swept the country and left millions dead, After it Happened follows the trials of a reluctant hero, Dan, and the group he forms around him. They must battle the elements, find sufficient supplies and equipment to survive, and protect themselves against the most destructive force on the planet: other people.

Guest Post: Location Inspiration

A lot of fans ask me about the places in my books. Some of them are real, but most of them are figments of my imagination inspired by real places and changed to fit what I need for the story.

Following the mantra of writing what you know makes it easy to describe real places, but what to do when those real places limit your storytelling ability? How do you overcome that limitation to where your imagination wants to go?

In After It Happened, I did just that and based the early stories on places I knew well which allowed me to give that element of realism it so deserved. When the story evolved and moved on I found myself increasingly reliant on the internet to give me the visual backdrop of a canvas where I could paint my brushstrokes for the readers.

What to do when you’ve painted yourself into a corner? Two words.

Road.

Trip.

Minor spoiler alert, the story that starts in the rural centre of England moves south through the continent where pictures needed to be painted for the characters to play out their own story. I had to construct a set in which my imaginary actors could perform, and that required inspiration.

Now I’m not much of a people person – shock horror for a writer, I know – and even more so that I’m nervous of new places and not having a set pan to follow. I’m that person who arrives at the airport five hours early in case I don’t make the flight.

After a month of meticulous planning and creating an itinerary, I set off from home just after midnight to head south for le Chunnel.

From there, after half an hour sitting in my car as the train thundered along beneath the English Channel I emerged in the early hours in northern France with the same bizarre disorientation you get coming out of the cinema in the dark when you’d entered in daylight.

There I began what became an intimate and long-lasting personal relationship with the voice commands of my car’s navigation program. We very nearly split up when she unnecessarily took me on the Paris ring road as part of the return leg where I believe they were filming a new version of Death Race.

The first foreign leg, fraught with the confusion of being on the wrong side of the road, saw me driving from Calais to Bordeaux over about ten hours, with an additional ten percent of that spent stuck on a one-way system that gave me tantalising glimpses of the hotel I was supposed to staying at.

The following morning, setting off bright and early after three too many fresh croissants, saw me taking a stunning drive down the Pyrenees towards the first of my research locations.

That drive will forever be etched into my memory as the challenging, twisting mountain roads left my face aching with repetitive strain injury brought on by continuous grinning.

Due to the many errors made by my navigational companion, which may have been me ignoring her for the sheer enjoyment of driving, I found myself crossing through into Spain accidentally and then back to France before an inspiring tunnel lead me to a wonderfully inexpensive fuel station.

Trying out my (appalling) best French, I was shocked to be answered in Spanish and found out I was, in fact, a visitor of Andorra. That happy accident led to an hour of exploration and the inspiration for the seventh book of the series, even if I didn’t know that yet as I was researching book five.

Reluctantly getting back to my plan, I took to the mountain roads again to race the course of one of the rivers leading to my objective, Villefranche de Conflent. Literally the confluence of two rivers where a medieval walled town sat beneath a high hill crowned by an impenetrable defensive position called Fort Liberia.

These two places became so influential, so crucial to the story that without being there, without climbing the hundreds of steps carved out of the mountain itself and without walking the same ramparts my characters defended, I would never have created the story as it now exists.

Twice more I visited the town, getting by with my best (still appalling) French along with much pointing and smiling, until I’d walked every inch of the town until I could feel the cobblestones under my feet as I slept.

On what became my last visit there I saw a painting in the museum of a watchtower in a place called Sahorre which captured my frivolous attention enough to create yet another vital element to my books.

After a quick google I set off, opting to take the long walk as I had with the steps leading to Fort Liberia, and climbed that steep hill to spend a long time looking out over a cloudy-filled valley offering me line of sight for miles. I soaked in every detail I could, letting it infuse me in a way that sounds far too bohemian even to me, but that’s what I did.

Waking the next day with a number of aches to remind me that climbing two mountains on the same day was ill-advised at my age, I headed south for the sea.

I may not live anywhere near the coast now, but I grew up near it and always felt an affinity for a sea view and can still recall the calming sensation I experienced when I dropped out of the high ground to look down on what would eventually become the place I call Sanctuary.

Looking at the seaside town of Collioure, with the crown jewel of another medieval castle sitting proudly to loom over the entrance, I saw how these places would come together in my mind to create the perfect setting.

Wandering through the town again, earning odd looks from locals, I sat on the sea wall looking inwards to the town to form every wall, every rampart, every building in my mind until I could see it clearly. Even as the sun set there I still sat, drinking it all in until it became, and always will remain, my ultimate happy place.

So my answer to the readers when they ask if the places are real? Yes, they are. Only not in the literal sense.

My advice to other writers? Get out from wherever you sit to write. Chase your story to the places it takes you and don’t be afraid to change the world to make it what you need it to be. You never know what your imagination will create.

Purchase Links:

Amazon UK: https://amzn.to/329jlVg

Amazon US: https://amzn.to/2SYb6Hi

About the Author:

Devon C Ford is from the UK and lives in the Midlands. His career in public services started in his teens and has provided a wealth of experiences, both good and some very bad, which form the basis of the books ideas that cause regular insomnia.

Facebook: @decvoncfordofficial

Twitter: @DevonFordAuthor

Website: www.devoncford.com

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What do you think about the book and post?
Have you read this book already or any book in this series?
Are you going to add it to TBR?

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#BookReview : You Are Mine by Miranda Rijks

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You Are Mine by Miranda Rijks
Publication Date: November 25th 2019
Publisher: Inkubator Books
Genre: Psychological Thriller
Pages: 270
Stars: ★★★★★

Rupert has spent years searching for his perfect wife. Now he’s found her.

Her name is Charlotte Aldridge and she’s wonderful. A talented artist, modest and beautiful, she’s everything he ever dreamed of. Her hair, her eyes, her mouth – every little detail is perfect.

Rupert is confident that when they meet, she’ll fall in love with him just as he has with her. After all, he’s a wealthy British aristocrat. And he’s handsome – the relentless gym workouts and extensive plastic surgery have seen to that.

But what if Charlotte can’t see that they’re a perfect fit, that they’re meant for each other? Well, Rupert can be very persuasive. His father taught him certain methods which are extremely effective. Methods that can turn the most determined, ‘I don’t’ into a meek and submissive, ‘I do’….

A chilling, up-all-night psychological thriller, You Are Mine is perfect for fans of Mark Edwards and K. L. Slater 

*** Note: I received this book from the publisher via NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review. Many thanks to NetGalley and publisher. ***

Other book I read by the same author:

You Are Mine was creepy psychological thriller that had creepiest villain I ever read. It was about loveless and emotionless upbringing and its psychological effect, how it shapes a person, mindset of psychopath and mainly about limerence- extreme love obsession.  

Writing was fantastic, gripping and fast paced. Setting of old mansion in Sussex with its vast property, hall of pictures, ball room and punishment room made the book even more unnerving. Book was mainly set in present narrated both from Rupert and Charlotte’s POV, alternatively. There were intermittent chapters from the past that gave the picture of Rupert’s childhood, his family and upbringing and how the characters in this chapters were directly or indirectly responsible for what was happening in present.

Book started with Charlotte’s art exhibition, pictures she created six month before the tragedy in her life, but she was distant far away from happiness. She was still grieving for her fiancé. Her inspiration died with him, she struggled to paint and maintain economical condition. Surprisingly, on the first day of exhibition she met aristocratic man, Sir Rupert, who offered her huge amount for painting his portrait staying at his mansion. Charlotte had to accept the offer to pay her debts even though she had her doubts and felt uncomfortable. But she couldn’t have guessed what she was getting into by accepting the offer.

I was curious to see when and how Charlotte will see through Rupert and his intentions, why he chose Charlotte and what methods he was going to use that was mentioned in that synopsis, If Charlotte will escape this psychopath or succumb to his persuasion.

First half of the book outlined the characters. Charlotte was decent character. She was physically week mentally broken because of her fiancé- Matthew’s death. She was normal girl with good looks, simple life and great talent, she couldn’t get into any sort of trouble until Rupert stepped on her life. I was glad for her sixth sense, I just wish she would have reacted to it earlier but I know that wouldn’t have stopped Rupert, would it? Her resilience and determination to fight Rupert was great but she was not strong enough. Of course she had a chance but she was too polite and wasted to grab it. And that dragged her into nightmare.

I loved Charlotte’s sister Jodi and their sisterly bond, the role she played. She was utterly brave and strong person.

Author has knack for creating hell of twisted and demented psychopath. Rupert was one horrible character. He was self-centered, materialistic, typical aristocrat who thought he could buy everything with his money, even love. His character showed how far a person monster can stoop to get what he want. I had to agree he had troubled childhood, I didn’t approve the way he was treated at school or at home. He clearly needed guidance with love and care and of course a psychiatrist. No matter how sorry I felt for 15-yr-old Rupert, I hated him as much. He never understood no or what true meaning of love was.

I definitely held all the characters in his life (his father, even that cook, and partly Simone – she might be a bitch but she was clear from the very beginning and I agreed with her views) responsible for creating this psycho and letting him roam free. He didn’t deserve pity or a chance or the impression people had in their mind. Oh hell he didn’t deserve to breathe one molecule of oxygen. You see he made me so angry. I was so shocked, horrified and disgusted reading his POV. But I must say he was smart and brilliant in the book.

Now I could predict what he did to get Charlotte and why, some in the beginning and some within first half. There was no big suspense and still I couldn’t have guessed what happened in the second half. I thought first half was scary but my goodness, the second was epitome of scary. I lost the count how many times I cursed while reading it. The methods he used and what he did to her was dreadful.

Climax was tense and tragic. I wish I could change it. End was great. After reading this book I so wished I can cast some magic on my daughter that can ward off psychos of the world.

Overall, it was dark twisted, riveting psychological thriller. I highly recommend this to fans of this genre.

Books Links: Goodreads
Affiliate Link: Amazon.in | Amazon.com

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What do you think about the book?
Have you read this books or any book by the same author?
Which book you read had most scariest villain?

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#BookReview : A Woman to Blame by Vincent Panettiere

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A Woman to Blame by Vincent Panettiere
Publication Date: October 14th 2019
Publisher: BookBaby
Pages: 400
Genre: Mystery / Suspense
Stars: ★★★★☆

Hours after a thoroughbred racehorse collapses and dies after finishing last in a race he was favored to win, his trainer—a young woman with a promising career—is found dead on a suburban Chicago beach. To the police, it’s a simple case of murder-suicide. But Mike Hegan, veteran police detective, refuses to believe the official story. Instead of retiring like they want him to, he embarks upon a search for the truth, and finds himself on a Caribbean island where scores are settled—and lives are lost.Fans of James Patterson and other crime fiction writers will find a new hero in Mike Hegan—a detective who defies convention to make sure that justice is served.

*** Note: I received this book from the author, in exchange for an honest review. Many thanks to author. ***

Books I read by the same author:

A woman To Blame was first in Mike Hegan mystery series. This book was packed with murder, drama, horse race gambling, mafia feud, exploitation and swindling along with grief, loss, guilt, and romance.

As I read the second book in this series I was familiar with the writing style. Like second book in this too, it was third person narrative from multiple perspective. The plot was interesting and suspenseful.

It started with wedding bell ringing over Hegan’s head, he was trying to take leap of faith and marry Lucy in 6 months. 6 months later, he was returning back to Chicago from Caribbean with dead bodies, one of it was of woman’s for which he would feel guilty forever. Timeline was not mentioned and so it was confusing in the beginning but I could make connection later. It made me curious to know what happened to marriage and how and why he went to Caribbean. It peddles back taking readers to present and to the case mentioned in the synopsis and how it all started with a burnt fish. Yes, you heard it right and it was quite funny. That burnt fish and huge misunderstanding leads to mafia feud, a dead body of loan shark, vendetta and to the death of thoroughbred race horse and its trainer.

Lots of things happened with many turns and some shocking twist that involved long list of characters and many suspects. All characters were introduced one by one- some with their story and what was going on in their life and some indirectly related to them- and how they all, directly or indirectly, were connected to the death of a young woman with promising carrier as horse trainer. It was clear very early how that woman died. The story was about who killed her and why and how it leads Hegan to Caribbean. As I read more, new questions were added to the mystery and it made me doubt to my theory and my guesses.

Along with this complicated but really interesting mystery there were glimpse of Hegan’s life, his girlfriend, his family drama and tragedy in his life (which was so very movie like, that made me shake my head in disbelief). His emotions, frustration and anger was palpable. It was really unfair the way his department was treating him, I’m sure there could be alternative to the situation Hegan was into, but I guess a departmental politics was involved here or more like keeping control of unruly officer and I could later case was more predominant. As the story developed, Hegan also developed, he learned to accept his situation eventually. His drive to get justice for dead woman was admirable and at the same time crazy. But his this madness unrevealed the complicated mystery and also helped him to move on in his life. I loved his sense of responsibility and protectiveness towards his loved ones.

All the secondary characters were great, even villain or villains. My favorite character was Clay and Portia. Clay was Hegan’s florist friend. I liked this big guy who made this tense story light. Portia was fierce, kickass artist, determined to find out who killed her sister. It was horrible to read what she and her sister gone through and after reading it, I felt they deserved happiness. I could understand Portia’s mistrust towards men and her extreme reactions.

Suspense was great that kept me guessing who real culprit was until climax. So much happened in last few ages. Climax was shocking, tense and tragic. Even after so much loss in short time, I liked how Hegan kept moving in life at the end.

Why 4 stars-

Though story was interesting and engaging, it moved slowly, maybe because of length. I didn’t like that dramatic turn at his sister’s house. Couldn’t Hegan shoot in defense, why being such hero and doing all that! And that scene around climax at cliff with Hegan’s taxi driver. It was eye roll moment. Both these scenes felt so Bollywood like.

Overall, it was interesting, cleverly written, complicated mystery with many characters and twist and turns.

Book Links: Goodreads
Affiliate Link: Amazon.in | Amazon.com | Book depository

Let’s discuss!

What do you think about the book and review?
Have you read this book already or any book by the same author?
Which is your favorite crime mystery/fiction?

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