#BookReview : All the Pretty Things by Emily Arsenault #AllthePrettyThings #Mystery #Thriller @PRHGlobal #BooksTeacupnReviews

All the Pretty Things by Emily Arsenault
Publication Date : March 17th 2020
Publisher : Delacorte Press
Genre : YA / Mystery-Thriller
Pages: 352
Stars : ★★★☆☆

For fans of Sadie and The Cheerleaders comes an all new thriller about a boy who turns up dead under suspicious circumstances and the one girl who may be the key to solving the mystery of his untimely death.


For Ivy, summer means roller-coaster season, spinning cotton candy at the Fabuland amusement park, and hanging out with her best friend, Morgan. But this summer is different.


One morning, Morgan finds a dead body. It’s their former classmate and coworker Ethan. To make matters worse, Morgan is taken to a hospital psych ward only days later, and she’s not saying much–not even to Ivy.


The police claim that Ethan simply took a bad fall, but Ivy isn’t convinced and realizes it’s up to her to get answers. What she finds is unsettling–it’s clear that some people aren’t being honest about Ethan’s last night at Fabuland. Including Morgan. And the more secrets Ivy uncovers, the closer she gets to unraveling dark truths that will change her life forever. 

*** Note: I received e-copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review. Many thanks to PRHGlobal for free copy. ***

All the Pretty Things was YA small town mystery that revolved around Fabuland amusement park, Ethan’s death and reason behind Morgan’s silence. It was about workplace harassment, health risks at amusement park, motivated perception and ignorance.

Writing was easy, intriguing and good but not best. Setting of Fabuland- amusement park in small town, Danville was fabulous. Story was first person narrative from Ivy’s POV.

All the Pretty Things started with Ivy receiving news about her best friend- Morgan. She discovered dead body of coworker and classmate on her way to Fabuland. Soon they found Morgan but she wasn’t herself and was admitted in psych ward. She wouldn’t talk to anybody, not even to Ivy. She just vaguely pointed her questions about Ethan’s death. To find out what happened to Ethan and how it affected to Morgan, Ivy carried out her own investigation. And what she found out in process was disturbing that might change her life. The story was all about what was the mystery behind Ethan’s death and Morgan’s distressed state, Why she would shut out her best friend, and what Ivy discovered at the end.

Mystery behind Morgan’s state was clear. I could figure out what might have happened to her. Within few chapters I also could see who might have caused her distress. As for Ethan’s death that was tricky in first half but easy to figure in second half. First half was all about introduction of Fabuland, Ivy’s family, her friendship with Morgan, Fabuland employees who were mostly young high school students and Ivy’s class mates, her father’s nature and dreams, and mainly Ivy’s investigation. This part was a bit slow.

Characters were interesting but not in depth. We see the world and characters through Ivy’s eyes and we know them only with their connection to mysteries so it was really hard to know or connect with characters, even with Ivy. 

 Ivy was okay, she was mostly playing Nancy Drew and piping her thoughts on what she found out. I couldn’t exactly say if she liked working at Fabuland or not or if she was working their out of love for her father- It seemed like combination of all of these. I didn’t like her for judging her brother as he didn’t came back to work at Fabuland and for taking side with her father without knowing whole story. At one point she was developed for her age- responsible daughter and helping her father and other employees, while at some point she was naïve and saw the world and her family’s issue through what she perceived as child during her parents’ divorce. And I can’t imagine how she couldn’t see her father’s vulgar language and behavior. One thing I liked was her reaction to truths she discovered. It was realistic and her decision at the end was perfect.

Best part of the book was setting. Amusement park was described wonderfully. Roller coasters, carousel, spin rides, cotton candy, ice cream parlor, food zone, water rides, princess parade, and sparkly doughnuts- All The pretty Things were there at this park. And I loved new ideas in promoting the park, fun activities and giveaways. And beneath those pretty things there was darkness and shadiness that made the story atmospheric. I liked the way author represented workplace harassment and possible health risk and accidents at amusement park. Through Ethan’s story it was also shown importance of health assessment and parent permission for under age kid before giving them job.

In second half, Ivy not just solved mystery of Ethan and Morgan but also reason behind why her brother Jason wouldn’t join them this summer and never work for their father. Winnie’s story and revelation at climax was perfect. Loved Ivy’s development and the way she accepted her ignorance and took right step at the end. End was perfect. I loved that big revelation just before end, slight different from what I guessed but I enjoyed it.

Why 3 Stars-

It wasn’t exactly thriller. I would say it was more like cozy mystery with a bit darkness. Plus it was easy to predict who was culprit because there was only one person who behaved wrong and inappropriately.

Dialogues were not good. All conversations started with huh, uh-huh, umm…! I lost count how many times these words were used. It really made conversations dull.

As I said above in characters part, there was no feel or connection to characters. Book was first person narrative but I know and see everyone else except main character. Maybe because it was more plot driven but characters were important part so I was expecting to know them better, at least Ivy and Morgan.

Overall, All the Pretty Things was simple and quick read with had great setting and interesting plot but predictable and not exactly a thriller. If you want an easy mystery, love amusement park and mystery in it with a little creepy feel, go ahead.

Book Links:

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What do you think about the book? Have you read it already or any book by the same author? Have you read a book set in amusement park?

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#BookReview : Pretty Things by Janelle Brown #PrettyThings #Mystery #Thriller @PRHGlobal #BooksTeacupnReviews

Pretty Things by Janelle Brown
Publication Date : April 21st 2020
Publisher : Random House
Genre : Mystery Thriller
Pages : 496
Stars : ★★★★☆ (4.25)

Two wildly different women – one a grifter, the other an heiress – are brought together by the scam of a lifetime in a page-turner from the New York Times bestselling author of Watch Me Disappear.

Nina once bought into the idea that her fancy liberal arts degree would lead to a fulfilling career. When that dream crashed, she turned to stealing from rich kids in L.A. alongside her wily Irish boyfriend, Lachlan. Nina learned from the best: Her mother was the original con artist, hustling to give her daughter a decent childhood despite their wayward life. But when her mom gets sick, Nina puts everything on the line to help her, even if it means running her most audacious, dangerous scam yet.

Vanessa is a privileged young heiress who wanted to make her mark in the world. Instead she becomes an Instagram influencer—traveling the globe, receiving free clothes and products, and posing for pictures in exotic locales. But behind the covetable façade is a life marked by tragedy. After a broken engagement, Vanessa retreats to her family’s sprawling mountain estate, Stonehaven: a mansion of dark secrets not just from Vanessa’s past, but from that of a lost and troubled girl named Nina.

Nina’s, Vanessa’s, and Lachlan’s paths collide here, on the cold shores of Lake Tahoe, where their intertwined lives give way to a winter of aspiration and desire, duplicity and revenge.

This dazzling, twisty, mesmerizing novel showcases acclaimed author Janelle Brown at her best, as two brilliant, damaged women try to survive the greatest game of deceit and destruction they will ever play. 

*** Note: I received e-copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review. Many thanks to PRHGlobal for free copy. ***

Pretty Things was slow-burn mystery thriller that revolved around two women from different background, one a con with plan of heist and other rich heiress spending her time in loneliness. It was about grift, con, gap between rich and poor and their mindset about it, social media and its illusion, pretty things and its not-so-pretty reality, dysfunctional family, friendship, love, deceit and betrayal.

Writing was beautiful, descriptive and often lyrical. I love it when there’s more than just story and characters. Deep, thought provoking and meaningful messages and quote worthy line are something I always appreciate it most in book and this had it in abundance.

Plot was interesting. Story was first person narrative from Nina and Vanessa’s perspective. They were given few chapters each sharing their view points on their present situation, telling their life story, how their path collided and what happened after that.

Pretty Things had intriguing beginning with Nina swindling a young rich Russian along with her Irish boyfriend, Lachlan. Nina conned rich people to pay her mother’s medical bill, but had set of rules- “Don’t take too much and only con those who deserve it and can afford to replace things they stole”. But when police came knocking at her door and sending her on run, they had to break the rules for one last big grift with more than enough cash that can help her mother’s treatment and give her new start. So, they decided to con Vanessa Liebling, young privileged heiress of Liebling estate, Stonehaven at Lake Tahoe. Now Nina has history with this place and she hated Lieblings. I was curious to find out what was the history, why she hated the rich and specially Lieblings so much, what they did to Nina?

This was character driven story. Most part of the book was character building and development. First 50% of the book told about present life of characters, their childhood, past, what happened in their lives that shaped their present and their mindset. This was slowest part and long chapters didn’t help in speeding the story.

All characters were flawed, complex and complicated. It was interesting to read their life stories, their mindset, insecurities and strength. The story was written in such way that my likeness scale kept tipping from left to right.

At first I didn’t like Nina. She was presumptuous, judgmental and selfish. She saw the world in only two shades, poor and rich and defined life based on that. Her judgement was fractured once she got involved with Vanessa in real life, living with her at Stonehaven with her.

The cold judgement she formed based on Vanessa’s Instagram v-life warmed eventually and she saw the reality of Vanessa’s life, her pain and emotions. I liked her development from this point onward. After major turning point she discovered many secrets that shattered the definition of world she created. I loved her for trying to do right thing at the end, taking decision that was hard for her. It steered her away from what she did whole life. At the end I loved her.

It’s easiest to judge from distance. That’s why the Internet has turned us all into armchair critics, experts at the cold dissection of gesture and syllable, sneering self-righteously from the safety of our screens. There, we can feel good about ourselves, validated that our flaws weren’t as bad as theirs, unchallenged in our superiority. Moral high ground is a pleasant place to preach, even if the view turns out to be rather limited in scope.

Vanessa was vulnerable, lonely woman desperate for love and appreciation. She was privileged and she knew she could get everything with money and looks. She used it to hide her flaws, her insecurities and lack of any talent. Circumstances lead her towards Instagram influencer life that gave her fame and illusion of world where people loved her and appreciated what she did, until it was shattered by one tragedy after other. She believed what her parents said and taught and one of those thing was Nina Ross ruined her brother- Benny’s life.

It was easy to like her and empathize with her. Her only flaw was she had low self-esteem and lot of self-doubt. She was naïve and stupid. Maybe not totally but I didn’t like how she turned blind eye to all the signs. But then again I liked her once the fog of naivety was cleared and she started using her brain.

Benny was diagnosed schizophrenic but he was most smart and sane person in the book. I felt for him. I wish he stood up against his dad all those years ago but at the same time I could see he was just boy whose parents didn’t understand him.  

I blame adults for everything wrong happened to Vanessa, Benny and Nina. Liebling family was typical rich dysfunctional family and had major impact on Benny’s mental condition and Vanessa’s self-esteem, while Nina’s mother was no better.

Perspective is, by nature, subjective. It’s impossible to climb inside someone else’s head, despite your best-or worst-intentions.

What I liked most was characters’ background and development and description of Lake Tahoe. It was both beautiful and atmospheric setting. Along with the luminous water of the lake, beautiful peaks of mountains, there lurked the darkness and coldness of Stonehaven. I liked the descriptions of Stonehaven and all the antiques there.

Another thing I loved was deep insights on social media and rich life, how people view it from outside and how the reality of pretty things are so different when you get close to it, and how actions of parents causes horrible consequences for their children.

Second half was brilliant, fast paced with surprises and twists that made me appreciate that slow first half. I liked character development and redemption arc in this part. The way Vanessa and Nina realized their mistakes and cleared misunderstanding was amazing. Turning points, surprises and twists were well written without giving away true intentions of characters and what they were going to plan next, and how they will come out of the mess they created.

Nothing is ever as pure as it seems at first glance; there is always something more complicated to be found when you peel back the unmarred surface of pretty things.

Climax was tense, surprising and brilliant. At this point I knew what they were going to do and what will be the end. End was good. I like it when characters get what they deserved. Epilogue was best, I liked how characters pulled their life together and tried to form a bridge over their differences.

Why 4.25 star-

First half was too slow. It took me more than 1 hour to read 10% of the book. I thought I would rate this book 3 or 3.5 at 50% of the book but then I loved second half and I could see how important the first half was, it helped in understanding characters and what was going on in their mind. I appreciated all those back stories. But then there was a little repetitiveness in first half which was, I think, because of narration style.

Overall, Pretty Things was impressive, deceitful, and twisted tale of two women with lots of secrets. I recommend this to fans of this genre, specifically those who don’t mind slow pace and descriptive, philosophical writing.

Books Links:

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What do you think about the book? Have you read it already or any book by the same author? Have you read a book(s) featuring social class differences and if so which is your favorite?

Happy Reading!

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#CoverReveal : Midtown Huckster by Leopold Borstinski #MidtownHuckster @borstinski @damppebbles @DamppebblesBTs

Hello Readers! I’m excited to be part of the cover reveal for Midtown Huckster by Leopold Borstinski, a new thriller in ALEX COHEN SERIES. The cover reveal is organized by damppebbles blog tours . Check out this interesting book and cover in this post.

Midtown Huckster by Leopold Borstinski 
ALEX COHEN SERIES
Genre: Thriller

Synopsis:

Can you keep your gelt and freedom when the cops have enough evidence to take you down? 

1930s Jewish gangster, Alex Cohen runs Murder Inc for Lucky Luciano. After the death of Prohibition he must find a new way to make money, just as the cops are baying at his heels. When Luciano goes down for racketeering, Alex loses his protection and is arrested for tax evasion-he must decide between saving his skin and ratting out his friends.

If he chooses prison time then his gang will fall apart and he will end up with nothing. If he squeals then he will have to flee the city he loves and the family he once adored. What would you do in a world where nobody can be trusted and you have everything to lose?

The third book in the Alex Cohen series is an historical noir novel, which plunges you deep into the early days of narcotics trafficking and the Jewish New York mob. Leopold Borstinski’s piercing crime fiction delivers a fix to every reader like heroin from a needle.

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The cover….

Promo video:

About Leopold Borstinski

Leopold Borstinski is an independent author whose past careers have included financial journalism, business management of financial software companies, consulting and product sales and marketing, as well as teaching.

There is nothing he likes better so he does as much nothing as he possibly can. He has travelled extensively in Europe and the US and has visited Asia on several occasions. Leopold holds a Philosophy degree and tries not to drop it too often.

He lives near London and is married with one wife, one child and no pets.

Social Media:

Twitter @borstinski | Facebook | Website | Instagram

Pre-order Links:

Amazon UK | Amazon US

What do you think about the book and cover? Have you read this book already or previous books in the series? Are you going to add it to TBR? 

HAPPY READING!!

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The Twin cover pic

#BookReview: The Twin by Natasha Preston @PRHGlobal #TheTwin #Psychological #Thriller #YA #BooksTeacupnReviews

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The Twin by Natasha Preston
Publication Date: March 3rd 2020
Publisher: Delacorte Press
Genre: Psychological Fiction / Thriller / YA
Pages: 336
Stars: ★★★☆☆ [3.5]

In this twisty psychological thriller from the #1 New York Times bestselling author of THE CELLAR, Ivy finds out that her twin sister, Iris, is trying to push her out of her own life–and might be responsible for their mother’s death.

After their parents divorced, 10-year-old twins Ivy and Iris were split up–Ivy lived with Dad, Iris with Mom. Now, after a tragic accident takes their mom’s life, the twins are reunited and Iris moves in with Ivy and their dad. Devastated over Mom’s death, Iris spends the first few weeks in almost total silence–the only person she will speak to is Ivy. Iris feels her life is over and she doesn’t know what to do. Ivy promises her twin that she can share her life now. After all, they’re sisters. Twins.

It’s a promise that Iris takes seriously. And before long, Ivy’s friends, her life at school, and her boyfriend, Tyler, fall under Iris’s spell. Slowly, Ivy realizes she’s being pushed out of her own life. But she’s just being paranoid, right? And Mom’s accident was . . . just an accident. Right? It’s not like she–or Dad–or Tyler–are in any danger. . . . 

*** Note: I received e-copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review. Many thanks to PRHGlobal for free copy. ***

The Twin was psychological thriller that revolved around twins- a good perfect one, really affected by mother’s death and other one who was twisted, evil, crazy, psycho, wasn’t affected by mother death but used it for her own gain! Basically an evil vs good twin novel. It was about unhealthy and toxic sister relationship, trust, betrayal and manipulations.

Now this book can be hit or miss. I’m somewhere in middle! In most of the book it was hit but the end changed it for me. Writing was amazing. Creepy, compelling, thrilling, and fast. Some may find it repetitive but that’s because main character has habit of overthinking and she kept asking herself same question. As per her nature it was perfectly written. Setting was atmospheric. The dread, fear and darkness never left till the end.

Now that synopsis says a lot. I was pretty sure- from synopsis and the way first few chapters were written– Iris killed her mother, she didn’t have feeling for her dead mother or grieved her death. She was only interested in getting to know Ivy’s friends and school. She was reserved at home, not speaking to anybody and staying in her room all the time but out of house with Ivy’s circle and friends in school, she was chirpy, happy, enjoying every moment and making it difficult for Ivy. It was obvious she wanted Ivy’s life, like everything her friends, dream, her place as daughter, student. The only big fat, million dollar question was why?

It made me curious to find out why she was doing these to her own sister who shared a womb with their own mother, who was only nice to her, understanding and ready to share her life with her. I was even more curious to see what Ivy was going to do about her sister and her crappy behavior, how she will save her loved ones or herself, how she was going to expose her.

I tell you answers weren’t pretty and so characters. Let’s make a good start, I hated them all at the end. I didn’t like her friends (I mean how can they say they were best friends), her dad (he should see through his daughters, parents are good at it, aren’t’ they? Or at least he should have known Ivy better), or any single character there was. They were big fat disappointment. Except Ivy but I wasn’t even happy with her as well. I will get there later. 

Iris was gave bad vibes from the beginning. She was evil and manipulative in mind and nature, a psychopath who would stop at nothing to get what she wanted. She was definitely a pathological liar, damn smart, confident, and always four step ahead of her victim. She was nightmare throughout the book, literally. I just wanted to read this book as fast as I can to get away from this twisted character. Author did brilliant job with her. She was best psychopath I ever read.

Ivy was lovely girl. She was good to a fault. She worked hard for whatever she was and got in life. Best student, friend, swimmer and daughter and even tried to be, if not best, better sister. He weakness was overthinking, overworking her mind and body, and lack of patience. Not able to play the game right, Iris started. She was bit naïve. I get it was all new for her but she should have drew a boundary from the beginning, should have reminded people that she loved her space and swimming was only thing that could chase away her worry and grief but she didn’t.

She gave Iris benefit of doubt even though her instinct said otherwise, even though she saw she was up to no good, and gave bad feeling! Her biggest mistake! Still she held on pretty good. She was resilient, tried to ignore rumors, gossips, hostile gaze and crappy behavior. Her boyfriend was her sole support and I’m glad to see him staying with her most of the book. She tried to get to bottom of this, find something to make her life better and expose her sister and that was great but she didn’t time it right. Patience is virtue was lost to her.

What made me lose my mind about her was, her lack of brilliance! You know she could get the evidence but she didn’t think about it. I did feel for her, though. She was such nice person. She didn’t deserve this. My heart felt the ache of her crumbling life.

It fast paced that kept me hooked to book till the end. I did feel it was bit stretched in middle because well, readers can easily see what Iris was doing and how Ivy’s life was snatched from her, you keep expecting there might be some glitch in Iris’s plan and keep hoping Ivy might find a clue or way to expose her evil side but we don’t see it coming, not until the confrontation and that came at 95%! Till this I felt so much hope, even during and at the end of confrontation, I kept hoping the light will shine on Ivy and chase of that dark witch Iris. But it turned out so hopeless. End totally froze my mind. I couldn’t stop thinking all that happened in that last 5% of the book. I literally couldn’t sleep. Honestly I was disappointed with the end.

Why 3.5 stars-

Where exactly it totally blew my mind was, I could get why Iris did that to her mother. What I cannot get my head around was why she did all these to Ivy. You see, usually there can be reasonable explanation like, ‘parents favored other sibling or she was popular or your boyfriend preferred her over you…’ something you can a put a finger on. Here it wasn’t case, there was not a particular reason that can explain Iris’ behavior except she was not right in mind, got a kick out of doing all these.

As I said I didn’t like the end.

Another thing is it was so implausible. I mean how 16 years’ worth life can be snatched from a person in 6 weeks! Wouldn’t there be a single person who can help or see through this!

Overall, it was great, dark, twisted, psychological thriller with brilliant villain but heavy and tragic end. Those who doesn’t want or expect happy ending in thrillers, will love it.

Book Links:

Goodreads

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What do you think about the book and my review? Have you read this book already or any books by the same author? Are you going to add it to TBR? Which book you read that had best or worst Twin relationship?

HAPPY READING!!

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#GuestPost #Guestpostseries by Alan Camrose, author of Lost In Plain Sight (Part V) @AlanCamrose

Hello readers! Today I’m pleased to share last Part of guest post series by Alan Camrose, author of Lost In Plain Sight this month. If in case you missed first and second part of this series here is the link – Part I Part IIPart III | Part IV

Over to author…

Firstly, thanks to Yesha for agreeing to me guest-posting on the site. Much appreciated, and I hope that you all enjoy my Blog posts which are a sideways look at my writing and my book. 

The Gallery on my website (www.alancamrose.com), and my Blog generally, is intended to be a place that shows a bit about me as well as stuff about my work. 

I have just published my first novel, “Lost In Plain Sight”, a fantasy-thriller set in Brighton, full of action, magic, humour, where Sam, Pagoda and Meyra are on the case to track a demonic killer and find more than they bargained for. (Since Pagoda is a cat, she’d like to be in the case.) They encounter among other things a goblin fatale, a werewolf with exquisite dentistry and a sat-nav with personality issues. I’d love you to join me by the seaside for some ice cream and mayhem…

***

Part 5 of 5

Pier Pressure – Brighton Beach Backdrop

Pinkie Brown is a psychotic and ruthless underworld figure in Graham Greene’s classic 1938 novel, Brighton Rock (and the classic movie in 1948 (Richard Attenborough), and the re-make in 2010 with among others Helen Mirren – Official Trailer. Pinkie would be an unlikely poster-boy for the Brighton tourist trade. The  brawling tribes of mods and rockers portrayed in Sixties Brighton in the movie Quadrophenia wouldn’t be on their shortlist either. (Official trailer) To give you an idea of the menace that is in this book and the movies, imagine you’re the teddy bear – are you feeling lucky, Teddy?

The city has not otherwise featured to a great degree in literature or movies (Brighton Beach Memoirs doesn’tcount), but does pride itself on its eclectic cultural scene. As an example, I went to see Mark Knopfler play at the Brighton Centre a while ago: magic! It hosts a challenging marathon (which I have witnessed, I confess, as a supporter rather than a participant), and the legendary annual Brighton Naked Bike Ride where riders struggle to stow their gear. Combined with among other things the Palace Pier, the towering Needle observation deck (the British Airways i360) and the barking mad architecture of the Brighton Pavilion, there’s clearly a lot to see.

I have been going to Brighton throughout my life with my parents, often to the pitch & putt on the front when I was a kid, and achieving a keen grasp of ’99’ tasting. Then I went with friends, and now family and friends. The city has changed from a more traditional seaside town of ice cream, sticky rock and fish & chips to the newer, more wide-ranging, place to be.

I found that it was a natural choice for me to use Brighton and its local area as the main backdrop to my new fantasy-thriller, Lost In Plain Sight. I was drawn to it by my familiarity with the place, the excitement that it still gives me to go down there and crunch over the beach and visit the Regency on the seafront for some hake and chips. And an edge to the place, created by the ebb and flow of visitors to the city. Never the same twice.

I think the West Pier is probably my favourite landmark in Brighton. Visit the webpage and you’ll see its allure. It used to be an elegant slice of seaside glamour, then fires and the elements conspired to bring it down before its redevelopment, leaving what now looks like a black rib-cage hovering in and above the sea, no longer a counterpoint to the Palace Pier, more a dwindling marker of past glory. 

I describe it in my book:

The sea and the sky danced on the horizon, impossible to tell apart, the view broken only by the brooding, spidery remains of the burnt-out West Pier, soaking up sparkles from the water with grim determination.  

All those years of my walking along the waterfront, visiting the Palace Pier, then further along to reach the Bandstand and the remains of the West Pier. all eventually coalescing into scenes in my book.

Pinkie would have attacked it with sledgehammers to finish it off, but it sits there now, crumbling into the sea. It’s a symbol of keeping going against all the odds. Like the investigation team in my book. 

And now it looks like the West Pier will rise from those flames and rival its neighbour again. 

That mirrors the way Brighton has changed and re-shaped itself over the years, its history a splendid backdrop for, well, everything.

Cheers,

Alan

Alan Camrose

***

About Book:

This novel is a contemporary fantasy-thriller set in the UK around Brighton. There’s action, suspense and humour. And useful insights on cats. And magic. And magical cats.

Sam Franklin is a wizard from the real Magic Circle. Pagoda – is his cat familiar (or is it the other way round?). Meyra is a stroppy elf with teenage angst issues even after forty years in her teens. They are drawn into tracking a demonic killer on England’s south coast. The demon is not just at the seaside for the greasy doughnuts: its masters prey on the poor and vulnerable in society with the terrifying prospect of ancient dark magic (or rather Ma gic, the dangerous word with six letters, one invisible and silent) running wild once more.

Sam and Pagoda find themselves dragged into the plight of the local homeless community, Meyra into the vast dangers of drug-fuelled excess, all reach the same place with the clock ticking and cultists chanting, waiting for a terrible conspiracy to come of age.

But all this pales into insignificance before such questions as: can the three oddballs work together to save the day and get home in time for a good grooming? And why does Sam keep having a worrying urge to shred sofas, chase rodents and cough up hairballs? Why is Meyra worried about whether her Moncler Calypsos look good on her during a spot of burglary. And last but absolutely not least, why does Pagoda fret about the handball rule while she curls up in tiny places and tries to get some hard-earned (by cat standards) sleep?

NOTE: IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO READ AND REVIEW THIS BOOK, PLEASE CONTACT AUTHOR FOR REVIEW COPY.

Let’s discuss!

What do you think about the book and post?
Are you going to add it to TBR?

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